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Join Fashion Revolution Week and become more sustainable

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This year marks ten years since the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Bangladesh – and the founding of the Fashion Revolution.

Fashion Revolution
Photography credit: Donna Wilson

The fashion industry has a sustainability problem – and it’s time we acted. It’s time for a Fashion Revolution.

Over the last decade since the Rana Plaza tragedy, Fashion Revolution has been campaigning for a clean, safe, fair, transparent and accountable industry that conserves and restores the environment, valuing people over growth and profit.

The impact fast fashion has on people and the environment will be highlighted with Fashion Revolution Week.

SUSTAINABLE FASHION

Every year, Fashion Revolution urges us to ask brands the question ‘who made my clothes?’ as a way for promoting transparency in the industry. In the spirit of this, Scottish brand Donna Wilson have lifted the lid on their knitwear process,

“At Donna Wilson, we knit every sweater, scarf, hat and pair of gloves in the UK. For over a decade our yoke sweaters have been made by the same family-run mill in Scotland,” the brand said.

“Our London studio, led by talented seamstress Lora, it has long been a hive of industry, but now we also have a team of highly-skilled local makers working in their Dundee Knit Shop, where we produce the rest of our knitwear and many of our knitted cushions and homewares.

“We’re committed to using the finest yarns and the highest quality production and processes to make pieces you’ll want to wear for many years to come.”

SCOTTISH TEXTILES

Alongside this, the Small but Perfect project was announced to encourage small businesses to get involved with the fight to transform the fashion industry.

The project recognises that small businesses can play a significant role in making the fashion industry more sustainable, by laying the groundwork for more comprehensive solutions across the industry.

It’s these scalable solutions that allow for long-term, sustainable changes, the project argues.

Small but Perfect is a 30-month programme where 28 small and medium businesses develop solutions for the fashion industry. To discover more, visit the Small but Perfect website.

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