The 31 steps

FREE FIRST USE - courtesy of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park A new iconic landmark has been added to the Scottish landscape. 'An Ceanne Mor' , Gaelic meaning large headland was unveiled today by Richard Lochhead MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment , at Inveruglas on the banks of Loch Lomond. The eight metre high, pyramid shaped structure is the fourth and final installation in the pilot phase for Scottish Scenic Routes - a Scottish Government initiative designed to encourage visitors to stop and see much loved views in a new way and spend more in the local economy.

Courtesy of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

If you haven’t experienced An Ceann Mor at Inveruglas,  the 8m-high pyramid-shaped viewpoint on the west of Loch Lomond, we recommend you get your walking boots on and go. At the top of its 31 steps, the elevated views of Arrochar Alps and Ben Lomond are impressive. A tunnel through its centre opens up to reveal the same vistas for those with limited mobility. An Ceann Mor is the fourth installment for Scottish Scenic Routes, a Scottish government initiative designed to encourage visitors  to see views in a new way.
FREE FIRST USE - courtesy of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park A new iconic landmark has been added to the Scottish landscape. 'An Ceanne Mor' , Gaelic meaning large headland was unveiled today by Richard Lochhead MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment , at Inveruglas on the banks of Loch Lomond. The eight metre high, pyramid shaped structure is the fourth and final installation in the pilot phase for Scottish Scenic Routes - a Scottish Government initiative designed to encourage visitors to stop and see much loved views in a new way and spend more in the local economy.

Courtesy of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

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This timber-clad structure, which will change colour and blend in with the landscape over time, was designed by Daniel Bar, Stephane Toussaint and Sean Edwards of BTE Architects after winning the competition to find young architects (practising for up to five years) to create four distinct installations in four geographically spread locations around Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park.

 

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